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Twitter has now banned revenge porn and doxxing

The social networking site has changed its usage policy to stop the posting of private information

Twitter has finally taken a step towards weeding out trolls by banning users from posting revenge porn. The social network's rules now state, "You may not post intimate photos or videos that were taken or distributed without the subject's consent."

They’ve gone one step further though. Now you’re not allowed to post any information that could be used to infringe on someone else’s anonymity, a practice commonly known amongst hackers as "doxxing".

Anyone caught in breach of the new terms of use could have their accounts locked, with persistent wrongdoers facing their account being suspended. Blocking accounts seems all well and good, but Twitter still won’t be able to stop that person from creating another profile and doing exactly the same again.

DCMA restrictions on removing revenge porn have also gone out the window. The site's admin will now be able to delete photos or videos straight away if the complainant can prove that it’s them in the explicit content.

Twitter's not the only one trying to crack down. Just last week Reddit, the internet's other bastion of free speech, banned revenge porn. The online community gained criticism last year after its involvement in the dissemination of  "The Fappening", an iCloud hack that resulted in the leak of private photos and videos of over nearly 500 celebrities.

While the banning of revenge porn on Twitter is unquestionably a great step towards changing an insidious culture of digital humiliation, putting a stop to doxxing has far more nuanced consequences.

The practice is used by a lot of online hacking groups like Anonymous, and LulzSec in their online war against everyone and anything. Groups like this may claim it's all for the greater good, but maybe such privacy intrusions revoke the right to higher ground.

Yes, doxxing has a negative history, and can be used to expose the target to all manner of harmful attacks, both digital and literal. Conversely though, a recipient of online trolling could get their account barred for posting messages sent from the abuser, without blocking out the IP address and handle of the sender first. This is something that might protect Twitter trolls, rather then expose them.

On the whole though, Twitter is sticking to its gun and protecting the anonymity and privacy of its users across for better, or for worse.