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The Diane – Red Star sexism realisation par
The Diane – Red Star dressvia realisationpar.com

Why this dress is being slammed as ‘sexist’

Réalisation Par is being criticised for calling one of its products a ‘get-out-of-jail-free card’ for when you forget to take the trash out or scratch your dad’s car

Australian label Réalisation Par is being criticised for its “sexist” product listing. Alongside a brief description of “The Diane – Red Star” dress, the listing features a “story” which outlines the intended use of the dress.

“Here’s what we know,” it reads. “Men love sundresses. We also know this point is actually pointless because we women dress for ourselves and ourselves only. But sometimes… just sometimes you need a get-out-of-jail-free card. Maybe you forgot to take the trash out or you scratched your dad’s car or maybe you were really late and you forgot do the one thing they asked you to do.”

“Whatever the reason, The Diane dress is the solution,” it goes on to say. “This is the dress that makes them forget why they were even mad at you in the first place and the only thing that really matters is: If you’re bad at being good, you better be damn good at getting out of it. Trust us. You’re welcome.” 

Launched in 2015, Réalisation Par was started by Australian model and blogger Alexandra Spencer and designer Teal Talbot, and differentiates itself from rivals by creating individual pieces rather than seasonal collections.

Responding to the listing in a think piece for Oxygen.com, Dazed Digital contributor Kat George says that despite saying “we women dress for ourselves and ourselves only,” the story actually reinforces extremely sexist notions about women. 

“The thing is, it’s not playing the patriarchy at all. It’s adhering to the exact rules laid out by it,” she writes. “It’s willingly making oneself the object of masculine desire in order to appease men. It’s playing into the idea that women are helpless, and that we don’t have autonomy over own our own actions, and that we must instead deal the “silly me!” card so that some burly knight in shining armor will come and clean up our mess. It’s an ugly and reductive stereotype being used to sell a pretty dress.”

We have reached out to Réalisation Par for comment.