Autonommy portrait Dazed 100
AutonommyCourtesy of Autonommy
“I’d love to create a collection of augmented accessories to encourage people to think about tech and sustainability

Autonommy

Age - 24
 London, United Kingdom
@autonommy
Autonommy
“I’d love to create a collection of augmented accessories to encourage people to think about tech and sustainability

Thanks to our collective fixation with face filters, the first significant wave of AR influencers is just hitting the shore, and Londoner Autonommy is at the forefront. Progressing from ethical hacker to creative developer, her immersive AR effects provide pretty eye contacts and virtual braces, reference Co-star notifications and facial recognition technology, recreate IKEA x Virgil Abloh rugs, digital tarot cards and, most excitingly, full-blown clothing that transforms before your eyes.

“I try to reinforce the message of my name through my work – freedom from external control or influence,” Autonommy explains, noting that code is the primary medium for her self expression. Thanks to Lil Miquela and co, the virtual clothing space is burgeoning and the AR technologist is her own muse and model for the experimental digital looks on her feed so far. “My work is based on my vision of the future: how things will look when we’re all wearing AR glasses, how we’ll interact with things every day. I love reimagining the application of technology we currently have access to – if I can encourage one person to think outside the box, that’s more than enough.”

How is your work unique to you, or informed by your perspective, experiences, or identity?

Autonommy: Being a woman of colour in a white male-dominated space will always be something I’m made aware of. Representation, equality and accessibility should be a priority in tech but navigating this is not always easy. At times I feel like I have to work ten times harder to be recognised for what I do, and being transparent with the challenges I face is something I’m constantly working on. I tend to incorporate a lot of social commentary into my work, shaped by my perspective and world, and I’d like to start dialogues about authenticity, and ease people into the idea of finding comfort in being uncomfortable. Ultimately, I would like my work to speak for itself, and normalising diversity within developer spaces is a huge part of this.

When it comes to your work, what are you most proud of?

Autonommy: I’m proud of my lack of satisfaction – my constant need to build something more optimised or future-proof than the last piece of work. I’m in awe of the fact that I’ve been able to develop for brands and public figures I look up to so much, and I’m still struggling to comprehend the sheer amount of people that engage with my work on a daily basis. 

“I’d like to start dialogues about authenticity, and ease people into the idea of finding comfort in being uncomfortable” – Autonommy

How has the Coronavirus outbreak affected you, your work, and/or your community?

Autonommy: People are coming together in ways we didn’t know possible as a result of the current pandemic. We’re spending more time online in a way to maintain the in-person connections that we’re so used to keeping. Developing has become therapeutic for me in many ways – and it’s proved to be a method that we can help others – whether that be providing online immersive experiences, or communicating messages effectively. Lots of events have had to be cancelled, but with new restrictions, I think creatives have been pushed to think outside the box. It’s opened up a new wave of communication and connection.

What creative or philanthropic project would you work on with a grant from the Dazed 100 Ideas Fund?

Autonommy: I’d love to create a collection of augmented accessories and wearables. We’re in a digital age and people are very focused on impermanence so dynamic accessories are a great solution to encourage people to buy less and start thinking about tech and sustainability.

Felicia Pennant

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