Quinn Whitney Wilson
Quinn Whitney Wilson
“I want to develop and fund a series of creative direction workshops given to young, queer POC in Los Angeles

Quinn Whitney Wilson

Age - 27
 Los Angeles, United States
@quinnwilsonn
Quinn Whitney Wilson
“I want to develop and fund a series of creative direction workshops given to young, queer POC in Los Angeles

When asked to envision the future of her career path, creative director and filmmaker Quinn Whitney Wilson pulls no punches: Girl. I’m limitless!”

Having started her career as Lizzo’s make-up artist, Wilson is now the singer’s award-winning creative director, handling her live performances at the Grammys, Saturday Night Live, the Brits, as well as album covers, set design, music videos, and a world tour. It’s the plantings of an oeuvre that she’s already extremely proud of. “The work we have done together is work that we ourselves needed to see, hear, and feel,” she says. “I think by giving ourselves some representation and relief we’ve made others feel included.”

Behind everything Wilson does is the determination “to create and collaborate with artists whose mission is to expand the idea of what representation looks like”. Alongside creating the larger-than-life visuals for Lizzo’s “Juice” and “Boys”, she has also lensed music videos for Dazed 100 alum Mette Towley’s “Incandescent” and Cyn’s “Terrible Ideas”. Currently, Wilson is writing and developing a short film, reviewing scripts for her first feature film, and continuing to spread her creative and collaborative net within the music and fashion worlds.

How did you start doing the work you do, and what inspires it?

Quinn Whitney Wilson: I met Lizzo, who inspired me and others around her, and I couldn’t help but make art with her. I didn’t feel like I had a choice. The work I do with Lizzo and what drives my personal work will always deal with representing those who are underrepresented.

How do you want to influence the future?

Quinn Whitney Wilson: I want to be a point of reference for others, meaning I want my journey to be a roadmap and example for those who may feel unsure on how to make a living in creative spaces. We have so many options available to us, but so often, people who have had the privilege to even understand what those options are, are usually non-POC. It’s important for me to show others that there’s space within this creative direction/directing world for them. 

“Our job as creatives is to come together with solutions and outlooks of art that benefit our world aesthetically, for the sake of joy, and expression” - Quinn Whitney Wilson

How has the Coronavirus outbreak affected you, your work, and/or your community?

Quinn Whitney Wilson: This pandemic is weighing on our community in ways that go beyond our experience, and I think our job as creatives is to come together with solutions and outlooks of art that benefit our world aesthetically, for the sake of joy, and expression, and as a means to provide young POC especially with something to do that is creative and positive. 

What creative or philanthropic project would you work on with a grant from the Dazed 100 Ideas Fund?

Quinn Whitney Wilson: I want to develop and fund a series of creative direction workshops given to young, queer POC’s in Los Angeles. The format would be adaptable and essentially function as a ‘creative direction curriculum’ that schools and other community arts programmes could continue to use. The workshop would pair a small group of students with a ‘client’ – either a brand, a musician or another entity in need of creative direction. The team would then assign themselves roles within the Creative Direction workflow.

Specific roles would be defined in the ‘curriculum’, giving students insight into the actual job titles and responsibilities involved in the process. Throughout the week-long experience, the team would collaborate in fulfilling a creative solution to meet their client’s needs. Clients can range from local businesses and artists or musicians to more prominent entities and figures. Despite Covid, I want to reiterate that this project can still exist, but through an online service like Zoom. In addition, I think this could have an aspect to it that lends itself to supporting those in need during this time. 

Ashleigh Kane

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