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Maison Margiela AW18
Maison Margiela AW18Photography Ines Manai

Maison Margiela’s AW18 collection was all about ‘dressing in reverse’

And featured more of the holographic and transparent details first seen in last month’s Artisanal collection

Paris temperatures dipped to -7 this morning, but the Maison Margiela show was definitely worth venturing into the cold for. As usual, Galliano did not disappoint. Here’s everything you need to know.

THE SOUNDTRACK WAS EPIC

After Julee Cruise’s haunting and sombre “Falling” from Twin Peaks played while guests took our seats, the music that accompanied the show itself was a shock to the system. Models marched out to an ear-drum bursting mash-up of beats so loud they made the ground shake, paired with remixed, hyperspeed country music. What did it mean? We’re not sure, but it sounded amazing (and definitely woke us up).

THE COLLECTION WAS INSPIRED BY ‘DRESSING IN REVERSE’

Meaning that trench coats were worn under dresses, herringbone sweaters were thrown over masculine, wide-shouldered blazers, tulle slips were layered over trousers, and outerwear became underwear. Elsewhere, some of the techniques seen at last month’s menswear and Artisanal shows were out in full force; fisherman-style jumpers were overlaid with rubber, and transparent and holographic fabrics were omnipresent too, appearing as panels in outerwear and layered over a series of dresses.

THE ‘GLAM SLAM’ BAG WAS BACK

A stand-out accessory from last season’s collection, the Glam Slam bag (which could also double as a v comfy pillow) was back for AW18 - with some supersized versions rendered in high-shine holographic materials this time around. The models also wore silver stacked sneakers and detachable quilted bands over the sleeves of their jackets.

THERE WAS MORE PROTECTIVE HEADWEAR

The AW18 menswear show featured a series of transparent swimming cap-style headwear which appeared to have evolved by the time it came to the womenswear collection. Models wore bright primary coloured and transparent hoods that looked not dissimilar to those of the hazmat suit, while others were sent down the runway in beekeeper-esque hats with see-through veils that stopped at their shoulders. Meanwhile, inspired by the way tech gadgets serve as extensions of the body (we’re going to take a wild stab in the dark and say you’re reading this on a smartphone, right?) jewellery took on a prosthetic feel, seemingly growing from the models’ wrists, fingers and neck.