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Teenage misdemeanours through Larry Clark's film reel
Teenage misdemeanours through Larry Clark's film reelLarry Clark; Courtesy of Larry Clark/United Arrows

Three things you never knew about Kids

Larry Clark’s seminal look at New York teens celebrates 20 years with a Supreme capsule collection

After hanging with skaters for over three years, photographer and director Larry Clark decided he'd blow the scene wide open with Kids – his torpid, wanton feature about horny, disaffected youth. “I wanted the audience to feel they were eavesdropping on a world they had no chance to enter at all. So it was filmed that way,” Clark says in a new interview, revealing fresh details about the making-of Kids.

It debuted in 1995 and 20 years later, it's still tacked up as the ultimate portrait of what it's like to grow up in the big city. “I had a very, very clear vision of what I wanted,” he says of the film. “There was no, 'What do I do now?' I knew exactly what I was doing.” To celebrate its 20th anniversary, Clark teamed up with Supreme for a capsule collection with clothes featuring stills of the flick. He also lets slip on a few fun details that you might not have known…

SOME OF THE CAST NEVER MADE IT IN THE FILM BECAUSE THEY WERE BEHIND BARS

“A couple of people we had cast couldn't do it because they were in jail. But most of the cast we chose and then Harmony (Korine) wrote for them. Harold was Harold (Hunter). Casper was Justin (Pierce). The girls were a little difficult to find because we had to find girls that were actually 18 that looked 12. Chloë (Sevigny) was cast completely against type. She was a club girl. She was around, you know?”

ONLY ONE SCENE WAS UNSCRIPTED

“It was all scripted. There was no improv except one scene: the four boys on the couch towards the end of the movie at the party? Those guys just showed up from San Francisco – three of them did and came over because they liked skaters and I just saw them and said, 'I have to do something.' So I stuffed them on this little couch about this wide (gestures), and I said talk about this, talk about this, talk about this. It was just magic. It was probably the best scene in the film. It was incredible.”

THAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN REAL WEED

“We talked for about 10-15 minutes and then I cut it. Then they were pretending to smoke marijuana. It could've been real, I don't know. But I do know that some of the crew, after the scene there was a problem. Some of the crew wanted to quit. They thought that maybe I shouldn't be filming 13, 12-year-old kids smoking weed. But wasn't my weed!”

Supreme is releasing a collection of items featuring stills from the iconic film available in-store NY, LA, London and online May 21st