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Stuart Semple eBay website
likesharetweetrepeat.co.uk, one of the websites for sale

Want to buy some digital art? Just head to eBay

Internet artist Stuart Semple is selling five browser-based websites on the auction site

Digital art isn't the world's most lucrative game. Last year, internet artist Michael Green attempted to sell the world's most expensive GIF on eBay – for the princely sum of $5,800. It didn't sell. Now British artist Stuart Semple is offering something different: the chance to buy five browser-based websites on eBay.

Taken from his Born Digital series, the eBay offering includes AndyFor15Minutes.co.uk, a site where you watch Andy Warhol talking about "making conventional movies" for 15 minutes (obv); metametameta.co.uk, a site that repeatedly shouts the word "meta" at you, and likesharetweetrepeat.co.uk, an infinite scroll which spews out comments taken from random social media profiles. 

Unlike Green's attempt, Semple's auction isn't doing too badly. AndyFor15Minutes.co.uk has received two bids, with the price at £500. LikeShareTweetRepeat has attracted one bidder at a price of £99. Semple is keen to point out that any website you buy is a "brand-new, unused, unopened and undamaged item" (we cannot vouch for this). 

"I have no idea (if they'll sell)!" Semple tells us. " I've never done anything like this before, I'm not sure anyone else has either. I like the fact people can pay what they think they are worth. I don't expect they will go for much, nothing like a painting. It would just be nice to see them get adopted by a collector so they can stay live and in the public domain. In one way I want them to go for loads to prove the public 'get' internet art but on the other I would like them to go for as little as possible so people who genuinely like them but don't have massive resources could have one. I guess we will have to wait and see."

"I've been really into artist created websites for a while, it's an interesting area because these are things that are challenging to own, confusing to collect and there's not really a place to purchase them," he adds. "I think eBay makes a lot of sense as a place where the public could adopt these things. I like the democratic nature of that. I love the idea that you can use the internet to sell the internet to the internet. That sort of fits in with the concepts within the pieces themselves."

Interested in buying a website you can't hang on your wall? You have five days. Get bidding.