George W. Bush copied his paintings from Google images

Dubya's political portraits bear an uncanny resemblance to images pulled off Google and Wikipedia

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bush painting putin
Russian President Vladimir Putin and his portrait Photograph via Wikipedia

When George Bush was interviewed about his new exhibition, The Art Of Leadership: A President's Personal Diplomacy, it seemed as though Dubya had successfully contemplated the personalities of other world leaders and channelled them into art. Now, it seems that he may have just Googled their names and painted the first image that came up.  

According to the beady-eyed people over at Animal New York, the former US president appears to have drawn his artistic inspiration not from years spent working alongside these leaders, but from the top search results on Google Images and Wikipedia. In fact, some of these images are the copyright of photographers from newswires like the AP.

Bush paintings
Israeli politician Ehud Olmert and Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Olmert via The Prime Minister’s Office / Sirleaf via rescue.org

Dubya doesn't have to worry about getting sued for illegal image usage, though: art critic Greg Allen, who first spotted that some of these paintings were taken from the subject's Wikipedia entry, told Animal New York that "copyright infringement is the one thing he's NOT guilty of". 

Art critics have been less than impressed with Dubya's art show. New York Times critic Deborah Solomon believes that Bush may have simply projected the images onto a panel and traced straight over them – a "completely legitimate method", for the record, but also one employed by desperate GSCE art students on a deadline. 

Welcome to the harsh world of art criticism, Dubya. 

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