Gray Wielebinski
“I would divide the grant money between ten organisations that support the trans and queer community

Gray Wielebinski

Age - 28
 London, United Kingdom
@gray_wielebinski
Gray Wielebinski
“I would divide the grant money between ten organisations that support the trans and queer community

“I make work to try and somehow feel rooted in my body, to feel connected to myself and the world around me, to other people, to the past, present, and future,” says London-based, Dallas-born artist Gray Wielebinski. A graduate of The Slade School of Fine Art, their multidisciplinary work also explores gender and sexuality, and how these intersect with structures of power through a practice that includes sculpture, printmaking, drawing, video, performance, sound, and installation. Such work includes digitally printed and resin-cast found objects, stuffed toys that have been picked apart and put back together to create new forms, and digital film, including Water bb (2019), in which Wielebinski captured synchronised swimmers choreographed by Dazed 100 alum Holly Blakey

Wielebinski already holds a comprehensive CV, having exhibited work internationally at London’s Seager Gallery, J Hammond Project, and Gazelli Art House, Goswell Road Gallery in Paris and Ltd Gallery in Los Angeles, amongst others. As they continue to explore their own personal relationship with gender, body, and trans socialisation, Wielebinski’s work also continues to develop alongside it, proposing new ways of how the world could be. “I want to interrogate different forms of power and myth-making, how these are interconnected, and question how they can be dismantled and redistributed,” they say. 

What are some of the projects you have coming up in 2020?

Gray Wielebinski: I have a solo show at Gallery 12.26 in Dallas, and a solo show in London at Hales Gallery. 

What are you prioritising in your life right now? 

Gray Wielebinski: Now, as ever, we are reminded of what we always have known to be true; that we are all connected, and to look after yourself means to look after everyone. I believe it’s best to prioritise those who are most vulnerable, who are most disenfranchised or pushed to the margins of our societies, frequently, with the least amount of support. (This happens) for a variety of reasons that often reflect flaws within ourselves and the systems we’ve built around us, and therefore we are all responsible.

“Now, as ever, we are reminded of what we always have known to be true; that we are all connected, and to look after yourself means to look after everyone” – Gray Wielebinski

What creative or philanthropic project would you work on with a grant from the Dazed 100 Ideas Fund?

Gray Wielebinski: I’d divide and donate the grant money between the following 10 entities (and encourage people to donate and share if they’re able in the meantime): The Trussell Trust, which supports a nationwide network of food banks, provides emergency food and support to people locked in poverty, and campaigns to change the need for food banks in the UK; QueerCare, a transfeminist, autonomous care organisation, providing training, support and advocacy for trans and queer people in the UK (and further afield); SWARM Collective (Sex Worker Advocacy and Resistance Movement), a collective founded and led by sex workers who believe in self-determination, solidarity and co-operation that is collecting donations for a hardship fund for sex workers in the UK; Galop, an LGBT+ anti-violence charity that provides advice, support, and advocacy to people who have experienced hate crime, domestic abuse and sexual violence; The Bail Project (Los Angeles) which combats mass incarceration and provides free bail assistance to low-income individuals in the United States, enabling their clients to return home to their families and communities while awaiting their court dates; Bail for Immigration Detainees (BiD), which provides free legal advice, information and representation to thousands of people held in detention across the UK; COVID-19 Mutual Aid Fund for LGBTQI+ BIPOC Folks; The Outside Project, a LQBTQIA+ Shelter and Community Center led by LGBTIQ+ ex-homeless, homelessness professionals & activists; National Domestic Workers Alliance, which works for respect, recognition, and inclusion in labour protections for domestic workers, the majority of whom are immigrants and women of colour; and Micro Rainbow, which supports LGBTI asylum seekers and refugees in the UK by providing safe housing, social inclusion and help with job opportunities and accessing vocational training or education.

Hannah Tindle

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