Dazed 100 Evanie Frausto
“I’d run a class for aspiring beauticians from disadvantaged backgrounds and showcase their work

Evanie Frausto

Age - 27
 New York, United States
@evaniefrausto
Evanie Frausto
“I’d run a class for aspiring beauticians from disadvantaged backgrounds and showcase their work

Creating fantasy is important to Evanie Frausto. Growing up in America as part of a conservative Mexican immigrant community, he felt unsure of his place in either world. As a teen he found acceptance in the camp fluidity of the MySpace emo scene, which was full of exaggerated beauty, and where he could be unapologetically himself. “Where I grew up, there were very real social differences that had such huge effects on our lives," he says. "Camp was a way to play with social status, to exaggerate it, turn it on its head." Stepping into the punk emo identity was a way to escape as a teenager, and the bold aesthetics of the movement still influences his work as a hair stylist today. “I’m still drawn to exaggerated, unapologetic and rebellious looks,” he says. “We always wanted to be the opposite of the norm, and today I still seek out things that are different.”

Undoubtedly a hair visionary, Frausto is always rethinking possibilities for self-expression and beauty and his carnivalesque style has led him to with creatives like Dazed 100 alum Arca and Dev Hynes, do covers with Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid, and campaigns for Fenty Beauty. He hopes that through his work, the art of hair will start being taken more seriously. “In the Latin queer community, there is still such an emphasis on masculinity that stops us seeing the value in hair and make-up," he tells Dazed. "I want to help hair (styling) be recognised as an artform in its own right.”

What issues or causes are you passionate about and why?

Evanie Frausto: I came from a Mexican immigrant community. Politically and socially there is still a huge stigma put on us. We’re constantly being characterised as lazy, as taking advantage of the US. This stigma makes it impossible to thrive. Growing up, I was made to feel that the white man was better than me, not just by white people but by those in my own community too. I really had to break that idea. I had to go through that mentally and emotionally, which took so much time. For so many of us, we still live in that box, convinced we don’t deserve more. I’m really interested in ways we can show each other how to break out of this mould.

What or who gives you hope and why?

Evanie Frausto: The new generation of people working in our industry gives me so much hope and confidence. This old false idea of beauty that you have to be a certain height, weight and race is already becoming outdated. When I was little, I literally wanted to be Gloria Trevi – she had this song “Pelo Suelto” (which means “Free Hair”), and I danced to it with my mom. But I didn’t really wanna be this rockstar woman, there were just so few people I could really relate to. Today, there are more people to see ourselves in. We can have bigger dreams. 

How has the Coronavirus outbreak affected you, your work, and/or your community?  

Evanie Frausto: Through my broader family, I know that hundreds of undocumented workers have instantly lost their jobs. Without any security, they are the first to go. They have no resources available to them and can’t seek help without risking deportation. It breaks my heart, because I know if this happened to my family ten years ago, we wouldn’t have survived. I’m very lucky, even though the situation has stopped my work, I can still be creative at home. Making things helps me mentally. 

“When I went to beauty school, I had no idea that working in fashion was a possibility for me. I want to use my teaching experience to show a new generation of beauticians that they can work in fashion, too” – Evanie Frausto

What creative or philanthropic project would you work on with a grant from the Dazed 100 Ideas Fund?

Evanie Frausto: I would love to run a class to give aspiring beauticians from disadvantaged, immigrant, and minority backgrounds an opportunity to rethink the possibilities of their careers and their craft. When I went to beauty school, I thought I would just work in a salon; I had no idea that working in fashion was a possibility for me. I want to use my teaching experience to show a new generation of beauticians that they can work in fashion, too.

Unlike traditional beauty school, we can give the opportunity to think outside the box and encourage self-expression. At the end of the class, we could showcase the student’s work in a photo exhibition, highlighting the students’ creativity. The grant would cover the costs of the space, a stipend for the students, and the organisation of the culminating exhibition.

Alex Peters

Thanks for voting