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The NSPCC drops Munroe Bergdorf following ‘anti-LGBT hate’ campaign

The activist and model was subjected to a transphobic campaign to have her dropped as an ambassador for the children’s charity

Model and trans activist Munroe Bergdorf has responded to Childline dropping her after what she calls a “transphobic hate campaign” launched on Twitter. Only three days before, Bergdorf announced that she would become the charity’s first LGBT+ campaigner for Pride Month.

The attack on Twitter, which came from a Times journalist, calls Bergdorf a “porn model” (which is both a demonisation of those in porn and just a false statement) and questions her right to be a Childline ambassador. In fact, the post even seems to suggest that people should cancel their direct debits to the charity if Bergdorf is allowed to remain.

In an Instagram post, Bergdorf criticises Childline’s reaction. “This Pride Month Childline had the opportunity to lead by example and stand up for the trans community, not bow down to anti-LGBT hate and overt transphobia,” she writes.

“But instead they decided to sever ties without speaking to me, delete all the content we made together and back-peddle without giving any reason why.”

She also highlights, in the post, the importance of representation for LGBT+ children while the debate about their right to exist is still (ridiculously) going on in this country.

“This comes just a couple of months after parents throughout the UK threatened to remove their children from schools for teaching about LGBT relationships and identities. My role with Childline was not paid, I accepted their request to become their first LGBT+ campaigner because I care about the wellbeing of all LGBT+ kids, but especially trans kids who are consistently targeted by British media outlets.”

Since being dropped by Childline, Bergdorf has also shared a doctored image of an NSPCC campaign (that she wasn’t involved in) merged with a magazine cover she shot, which was shared and criticised online.

The whole episode really highlights that there’s still a way to go with LGBT+ representation. If organisations such as the NSPCC want to use LGBT+ personalities for their campaigns (which they obviously should, as it benefits everyone) they need to stand by them instead of crumbling at the most insignificant protest.