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courtesy of Selfridges

Selfridges is removing all plastic-based beauty wipes from its stores


TextLia Mappoura

The London retailers pledge to sustainability is tackling plastic in our ocean

Did you know that between 4.8 and 12.7 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year? Much of the plastic being discarded is single-use items like straws and wet wipes. In 2016, the Marine Conservation Society recorded that over  14 wet wipes were found per 100 metres  of British coastline. 

If we continue at this rate, by 2050 the UN predicts the amount of plastic in our ocean will outweigh the fish. If this concerns you as much as it does us, then you’ll be happy to know that more and more brands are committing to sustainability. Next on the list: Selfridges.

After a recent survey found that 20 per cent of consumers use make-up wipes at least once a day, the retailing giant has taken action in the form of removing plastic-based beauty wipes from its shelves and from use in its beauty hall. 

This bold decision has come about as a bid to tackle the ongoing issue of plastic in our ocean. It can take up to 100 years for plastic-based wipes to fully degrade, meaning that there’s a high possibility that they can destroy marine life and enter the food chain in the process. 

As a replacement for the banned single-use wipes, the department store is providing recyclable and or re-usable alternatives in order to reinforce the need to consume more sustainably. These alternatives include DB favourite Face Halos, as well as Sarah Chapman’s Professional Cleansing Mitts, and Clinique’s Take the Day Off Cleansing Clothes. 

“Single-use beauty wipes have been a staple of many beauty drawers, but they are incredibly harmful to the environment,” says Daniella Vega, director of sustainability at Selfridges. “We’re proud to have made this commitment and to continue our legacy as a leader in the industry when it comes to our sustainability initiatives.”

The move comes as part of an ongoing sustainability campaign from the retailer. In 2011, Selfridges launched Project Ocean in collaboration with Zoological Society. Since then it has banned squalene and microbeads from all beauty products and palm oil from its own-label products, as well as removing plastic straws, single-use plastic water bottles, and plastic carrier bags from its stores.

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