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Nan Goldin

Art shows to leave the house for this month

Nan Goldin’s first major solo exhibition in London since 2002, the best photographic portraits from across the world, and an investigation into ‘always-on’ contemporary culture

STEVE MCQUEEN YEAR 3, TATE BRITAIN (AND OFF-SITE), LONDON

This week, Steve McQueen’s portraits of third-graders began appearing on over 600 billboards across London as part of the off-site, Artangel run component of the Turner Prize-winning artist and Oscar-winning filmmaker’s Tate Modern collaboration, Year 3. Opening next week at the London institution, McQueen invited every year 3 pupil across London to have their photograph taken by photographers from Tate. Described as a “milestone year in their development”, McQueen said: “There’s an urgency to reflect on who we are and our future … to have a visual reflection on the people who make this city work. I think it’s important and in some ways urgent.”

Steve McQueen Year 3 runs at Tate Britain from 12 November 2019 – 3 May 2020

PERFORMA 19, VARIOUS LOCATIONS, NEW YORK CITY

Performa 19 is currently taking over New York City with three-and-a-half weeks of incredible programming at various venues. From Korakrit Arunanondchai (whose work is currently also showing at Transformer at London’s 180 Strand) to Ed Atkins, Kia LaBeija, Tara Subkoff, and many more. Originally founded to explore “the critical role of live performance in the history of twentieth-century art and to encouraging new directions in performance for the twenty-first century”, this year Performa honours 100 years of Bauhaus, with the movement’s influence being found in many of this year’s commissions. Daily events and talks are also happening at the Performa 19 Hub in Manhattan.

Performa 19 runs until 24 November 2019. Full programme and tickets can be found here

DEREK JARMAN: PROTEST!, IMMA, DUBLIN

It’s 25 years since Derek Jarman’s death and, as time passes, his contribution across so many spheres of contemporary culture becomes even more apparent. While primarily known as a film director, Jarman was also prolific in a variety of mediums, and this is the first major retrospective in over 20 years to gather together his work as a painter, writer, set-designer, diarist, gardener and political activist.

Derek Jarman: Protest! runs at IMMO until 23 February 2020

NSF CRXSS PLATFORM FESTIVAL, COPELAND GALLERY, LONDON

CRXSS PLATFORM is back with a two-day festival showcasing the best in emerging street culture artists. Curated by Ivan Blackstock and based in Peckham’s Copeland Gallery, it features a full programme of multidisciplinary art. Prepare to experience live performance, DJing, vocalists, MCs, dance, and art ‘encounters’, including film from Akinola Davies Jr. and sounds from Nigerian Afrobeat artist Wavy the Creator.

NSF CRXSS PLATFXRM FESTIVAL runs at London’s Copeland Gallery from 8 – 9 November 2019

W.E.B. DU BOIS: CHARTING BLACK LIVES, HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION, LONDON

W.E.B. Du Bois is one of the most celebrated African American activists, intellectuals, and essayists of the 20th century. He’s been lauded by the likes of Martin Luther King and Beyoncé, he’s famous for co-founding the NACCP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), and for his prolific writing (including the influential The Souls of Black Folk). As an energetic and tireless advocator, Du Bois’ work persuasively counters the bizarre pseudo-scientific theories invoked and invented to justify white supremacy. Charting Black Lives will display the innovative infographics Du Bois produced with a team of African American students from his sociology lab at Atlanta University. Shown alongside original artwork by Mona Chalabi, data editor at The Guardian, Du Bois’ collection of turn of the century graphs, charts, and maps reimagines the prevailing racist ‘data’ of the time and illustrates the irrefutable fallacies of racism. 

W. E. B. Du Bois: Charting Black Lives runs at London’s House of Illustration from 8 November 2019 – 1 March 2020  

KAZIM RASHID: NOTHING LOOKS THE SAME AT NIGHT, THE THIRD LINE, DUBAI

Kazim Rashid's latest video installation explores the artist's continued fascination with the transformations that happen with the onset of the night. The film attempts to challenge many of our assumptions and expectations of the world around us and features Ziggy Ama Idir Iman, with whom Rashid communicated extensively prior to shooting, exchanging voice notes and ideas about the film's themes. 

Rashid was also heavily influenced by the radical feminist text S.C.U.M. Manifesto by Valerie Solanas, and a clip from I Shot Andy Warhol (a biopic of Solanas) is featured in the film.

Nothing Looks The Same at Night will run at Dubai’s The Third Line from 27 November 2019 – 6 February 2020

BRIDGET RILEY, THE HAYWARD GALLERY, LONDON

Bridget Riley, who's known mostly as a pioneer of optical art (a style which uses striking geometric forms to sometimes-disorientating effect), has been making art for more than 70 years. In the largest and most comprehensive retrospective of her work to date, this exhibition traces the lineage of Riley's art practice right back to 1947. The exhibition aims to provide a very unique insight into the processes and methods of the iconic British artist, displaying studies and preparatory work alongside her most famous pieces. 

Bridget Riley is showing at London’s Hayward Gallery until 26th January 2020

NAN GOLDIN: SIRENS, MARIAN GOODMAN GALLERY, LONDON 

London’s Marian Goodman gallery is hosting Nan Goldin’s first major solo exhibition in the city since the Whitechapel Art Gallery in 2002, Sirens. Featuring several bodies of work from her rich, decades-long oeuvre, as well as the debut of three new video works.

One being Memory Lost (2019), a digital slideshow which looks at a life lived through drug addiction, featuring a score from Mica Levi. Sirens (2019) is another new video work, again scored by Levi, and consisting of found footage. The title nods to the call of the Sirens of Greek mythology, who lured sailors to their deaths. Also on show is the newly edited version of The Other Side (1994-2019), originally published more than two decades ago, it is a visual homage to the photographer’s transgender friends, and features many images which have not yet been publicly exhibited. Salome (2019), another new video installation on display, is presented across three screens and takes the Biblical story of Salome to explore themes of seduction, temptation, and revenge. The photographer will also exhibit a series of her large sky and landscape images taken on trips across the world during the 2000s.

Sirens runs at London’s Marian Goodman Gallery from 14 November 2019 – 11 January 2020

TAYLOR WESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC PRIZE, NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON

The annual Taylor Wessing Photographic Prize has gone on show at London’s National Portrait Gallery, featuring winner Pat Martin. The Los Angeles-based photographer documented his late mother, who was a first-generation Jewish-American. Of the portraits, he said: “For most of my life, I misunderstood my mother and witnessed how the world misunderstood her. Photographing her became a way of looking into a mirror and finding details never noticed. There were always new ones to discover and something new to hide.” Other prizes were awarded to Irish-born, London-based photographer Enda Bowe who took the second prize for her fascination with capturing the ordinary in the everyday. The exhibition features a range of photographers from emerging to amateur, and established and aims to showcase the very best in global contemporary portrait photography.

Taylor Wessing Photographic Prize runs from 7 November 2019 – 16 February 2020

NAM JUNE PAIK: THE FUTURE IS NOW, TATE MODERN, LONDON

The late, experimental and pioneering South Korean-born artist Nam June Paik’s exhibition at London’s Tate Modern shows the immense impact he had on today’s art and culture. From coining the term “electronic superhighway” to predict how we interact with language and the internet today, to his collaborations with cellist Charlotte Moorman, as well as fellow artists and visionaries John Cage and Merce Cunningham, as well as Joseph Beuys.

Nam June Paik runs at London’s Tate Modern until 9 February 2020

ASSEMBLY CURATED BY CHRISTIAN MARCLAY, SOMERSET HOUSE STUDIOS, LONDON

The second edition of ASSEMBLY is curated by Somerset House Studios’ resident artist Christian Marclay and sees him asking fellow artists to respond to the sounds and acoustics of the street outside of the building to bring together a series of intimate musical performances. Taking inspiration from pedestrians, traffic, protests, roadworks, and the buzz of the central London location, over three nights, Marclay has asked Beatrice Dillon, Karen Gwyer, and more, to undertake six new performances which respond to his brief.

ASSEMBLY runs at London’s Somerset House Studios from 8 – 10 November 2019. Full programme is available here

TUTANKHAMUN: TREASURES OF THE GOLDEN PHARAOH, SAATCHI GALLERY, LONDON

Gold, afterlife treasures, and divine art that have weathered millennia make up Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, a travelling exhibit – and a farewell tour of sorts – on its last world-round trip before finding its permanent home once more back in Giza, Egypt. With a photorealistic version of the Egyptian king’s tomb as it would have been uncovered in 1922, to hulking headdresses, jewellery, and a VR experience, there are over 150 artefacts, 60 never seen outside of Egypt before. The cultural and artistic revolution that propelled Ancient Egypt into a new era during Akhenaten and Tutankhamun’s reign can be traced through portraiture, sculpture, and Tut’s own personal possessions. The sprawling show is a sumptuous tribute to King Tut, the boy pharaoh, teen warrior, and enduring monarch of pop culture.

Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh runs at London’s Saatchi Gallery from November 2 – May 3 2020

24/7: A WAKE-UP CALL FOR OUR NON-STOP WORLD, SOMERSET HOUSE, LONDON

Also on show at Somerset House is 24/7, an exhibition which investigates the exponential pace of contemporary life. Featuring over 50 contributions from artists and thinkers such as Douglas Coupland, Pierre Huyghe, and many more, the exhibition is described as a sensory journey “from the cold light of the moon to the fading warmth of sunset through five themed zones”. The title takes itself from Jonathan Crary’s synonymous book which explores “always-on culture” while suggesting ways to (at least temporarily) escape it.

24/7 runs at London’s Somerset House until 23 February 2020