Cynthia Nixon gets grilled by John Early on SATC and her political run

Tell us how Carrie lived in that apartment while barely freelancing

John Early must be protected at all costs. The comedian most-known for his unhinged role in dark comedy Search Party, turns his hand to political interviewing in an intimate conversation with Cynthia Nixon.

To support her campaign to become governor in New York, she sat down with Early to talk policy. Nixon has been vocal on issues relating to universal rent control, immigration rights, the legalisation of weed, and mass incarceration. Naturally, given his love of Sex and the City the conversation repeatedly comes back to Miranda. It is still worth noting that her political career has only been able to thrive since the cancellation of Sex And The City 3. Production was halted just a few weeks before filming due to a behind-the-scenes feud between co-stars Kim Cattrall and Sarah Jessica Parker freeing up some time to run as a governer. 

Playing on the dynamic between her sharp u-turn from actress to governer hopeful, he zones out several times to have his own Carrie Bradshaw-esque inner monologue and asks other pertinent questions like was Brady’s name Brady Brady or Brady Hobbes Brady? And when it seems like he’s getting back on track, he digresses: “Speaking of housing, how could Carrie afford to live on the Upper East Side when she literally wrote one column a week?”

“I am grateful for my acting career but I want to serve the people of New York, there are so many issues facing our state from education, climate change, mass incarceration,” she says after detailing her tenant protection program. In short, she has no time to talk about how she is one Oscar away from an EGOT, this campaign isn’t about her – it’s about her love of New Yorkers. 

Watch below.

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