Kalina Pulit

The former law student from Poland has a thing for objects, portraying them as part of a happy chaos

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Kalina Pulit ditched law school in Poland over four years ago for a Fashion Styling and Photography degree at London College of Fashion. She’s never looked back and like a magpie she’s been photographing colourful, shiny things wherever she goes. We couldn't help but notice these electric photographs... and here’s what she had to say about them...

Objects are very important to me I can’t help noticing them. I have a thing for chandeliers in particular. For me objects have stories of their own, without being put next to a person

Dazed Digital: Describe your role as a photographer?
Kalina Pulit: When I first started taking pictures many years ago it was all perfectly composed and considered, I took my time at every single step. Then I got into styling and art direction. Working in an environment where there are so many equally important elements that create the desired image made me change my approach to my own photography. It became a tool to document the ‘in-between’ moments and spontaneity played a big role in it.

DD: Is there a theme or idea behind these images?
Kalina Pulit: My series, Diarios de Kalinetta, started over two years with a sign ‘Disposable Cameras On Sale’ in a photo lab in Durham. I fell in love with the grain, the flash and the unknown. I’ve always preferred using analogue cameras but it was the easiness in capturing the moment that put disposables beyond any others. Many rolls of film later I’ve started noticing certain themes and colour schemes coming through. 

DD: Your work seems to be more about things than people – why?
Kalina Pulit: Objects are very important to me I can’t help noticing them. I have a thing for chandeliers in particular. For me objects have stories of their own, without being put next to a person. Colours, shapes, textures and patterns are key to me in my practice as a stylist so my eye is automatically drawn to them. I’m interested in people in relation to objects or garments.

DD: It makes me think of the morning after a party – mess and chaos and it’s all happy. How would you describe your work?
Kalina Pulit: Mess, chaos and happiness could be my keywords indeed. It’s some kind of flânerie. It’s about observing and extracting the beautiful things out of the rest. I’m sort of creating my own wonderland, my response to reality. It’s a happy place to be in, full of colour and shine.          

DD: Which photographers influence you the most?
Kalina Pulit: I admire Lina Scheynius’ subtlety, Viviane Sassen’s ability to merge objects/environment and subject into one, and Daniel Sannwald’s outstanding creativity.

DD: New plans and projects?
Kalina Pulit: I’ve recently finished a project in which Diarios photographs are directly translated into a fashion story and a short film under the theme of bricolage. I’m also working on a project with one of the sportswear brands at the moment but it’s still in its early stages.

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