Top ten albums of the month

Breaking hearts with Lykke Li's new release, the balmy eroticism of Sean Nicholas Savage and Fatima Al Qadiri's first LP

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SEAN NICHOLAS SAVAGE – BERMUDA WATERFALL

The beguiling songwriter takes us to the tropics for his sex-dream inspired eleventh full-length release, and it’s a balmy, erotic and, as always, confessional adventure to undertake. Find out more about Savage’s dreams and realities here

YVETTE – PROCESS

A look at the tracklisting of Brooklyn noise duo Yvette’s “Process” tracklist reveals the unabashed intensity captured within: “Pure Pleasure”,  “Attrition” , “Cold Comfort” et al. It’s a glowering, evocative record throughout which the pair wield their intoxicating force with glee. Guitars moan and slur, drums pummel and arouse, vocals growl and entreat; and then there’s that all that dangerous, callous and delirious industrial noise. Bathe yourself in it asap.

FATIMA AL QADIRI – ASIATISCH

On her entrancing debut LP, the New York-based producer explores the flagrant flippancy of Western perceptions of and assumptions regarding China and its inhabitants – whilst simultaneously re-introducing us to micro-genre sinogrime. Asiatisch is sculpted to pose questions rather than proffer statements, and it is radiant with this openness. As always, Al Qadiri creates every note herself, drawing structural inspiration from ancient Chinese poetry, and twisting “Eastern” sound tropes into songs that menace and delight. You can read about the making of “Asiatisch” here.

QUIRKE – ACID BETH EP

London producer Josh Quirke’s debut for the always-reliable Young Turks sees mostly electronic sounds – both recognisable and novel – contorted into innovative forms that command their own space beyond all the dancefloors, bedrooms, and concert halls they’ll ever find themselves played in.

TUNE-YARDS – NIKKI NACK

Merrill Garbus’ third album is a complex, silly, profound, and ultimately enlivening tUnE-yArDs work through and through. Longtime collaborator Nate Brenner retains his role as co-writer, synth player and bassist; and Garbus hers as exhilarator, protester and jester.

LYKKE LI – I NEVER LEARN

The Swedish singer delivers a record worthy of her pop star status on “I Never Learn”. Over earnest, acoustic guitars and tenderly arranged synth and drum-pad patterns, with emotional back up provided by strings and backing singers, Lykke Li brings us all into her post-break up tumult. Somehow, it feels triumphant. Read Dazed’s in-depth interview with Li here.

LITTLE DRAGON – NABUMA RUBBERBAND

The chillest four Swedes in music turn up the seduction for their fourth album, toying with tripped out slow jams like the gorgeous “Cat Rider” alongside the sharp, quick-tempered pop songs like lead single “Klapp Klapp”. The band members’ deep synergy, and spectacular instrumental and production skill, make for yet another Little Dragon album of relishable repeat listening material. Revisit our feature with the band here

HUNDRED WATERS – THE MOON RANG LIKE A BELL

An exercise in elegance, this second full length by the Florida group on OWSLA folds itself into your consciousness. Nicole Miglis’ precise vocal delivery doesn’t undermine the lyrics’ emotional weight, nor do the vast beds of electronic and analogue instrumentation strangle the message. Overall it’s not the most subtle record to come out this month, but it has a supremely true heart.

THROWING SHADE – 19 JEWELS

Confectionary overload of an opener “Sweet Tooth” belies the glitter-coated disconcertion to follow as a host of global sounds are set loose amidst shadowy bass and synth notes immediately familiar from grimy London dance floors. You can stream the EP in full here.

YOUNG MAGIC – BREATHING STATUES

Hypnotic, intelligent and expansive, this album by duo formed of Indonesian vocalist Melati Malay and Australian producer Isaac Emmanuel, takes us into an ethereal composite of foreign lands on their second album. The pair wrote this record whilst touring their first, and this transience is palpable, recalling the glorious excitement of realising you’re all on your own inbetween places.

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