Silent We Shout

Offering the opportunity to launch the careers of fashion graduates, Silent We Shout with Warehouse run a three day showcase and retail platform at the Old Truman Brewery.

Fashion Incoming
Stephanie Whelan
Providing a once in a lifetime opportunity to enable graduates to break into the ever-daunting fashion industry, Silent We Shout is a creative platform to offer exposure and income for a hand-picked selection of fashion designers using regular showcases with an online retail function to present the graduates collections. Showcasing at the Old Truman Brewery, East London, the launch will be over this weekend, acting additionally as a retail space. Dazed speak to a selection of the fashion graduates before the launch.

Stephanie Whelan - Royal College of Art:

Dazed Digital: What do you think is the biggest problem that faces fashion graduates?
Stephanie Whelan: There are so many colleges in the U.K. with fashion courses that graduates emerge from their studies alongside thousands of others. There are so many that it can be very difficult to be heard, with only a few students every year actually making an impact. Events like Graduate Fashion Week help give graduates the exposure they deserve, but with limited resources and funding it can be very difficult to sustain, or build on that. Also in the current economic climate things have become even more difficult. There are fewer jobs and even more competition for those that are there, a degree is often not enough and graduates face a long struggle to gain the experience necessary to make them stand out.

DD: What makes you stand out from the rest and shout?
Stephanie Whelan: I count myself very lucky to have become a part of Silent We Shout. I hope that I have been chosen because of my ability to create clothes which are not just beautiful but also beautifully constructed. I see making clothes as similar to sculpting. What makes me stand out is the sculptural quality and strength of the forms I produce. To me, even chiffon can be made into something with a strong silhouette. The clothes I make are a dichotomy, they're robust and yet utterly feminine.

DD: If you could sell your designs to anybody, who would it be and why?
Stephanie Whelan: When I'm designing its never a specific person I have in mind, but the idea of a person that I try to represent. For this collection she was going through a transitional stage, something in her life had changed dramatically and she was struggling to cope with that. In terms of who I would like to see wearing the collection, I think perhaps Julianne Moore. She's very sexy but at the same time has a down-to-earth determination that would highlight the sensuality of the clothes. And, being Irish, I have a thing about red hair!

Hoi Lam Wong - London College of Fashion:

DD: What do you think is the biggest problem that faces fashion graduates?
Hoi Lam Wong: The feeling of confused and lost, life seems finished by the time leaving school.

DD: What makes you stand out from the rest and shout?
Hoi Lam Wong: I am "Fresh".

DD: If you could sell your designs to anybody, who would it be and why?
Hoi Lam Wong: Bjork, she looks good in anything, she would make my designs look even better.

Beatrice Newman - De Montfort:

DD: What do you think is the biggest problem that faces fashion graduates?
Beatrice Newman: In my view the biggest problem that faces fashion graduates is being limited by high street fashion which restricts graduates from having creative freedom. For example the annual Graduate Fashion Week event which is sponsored by high street store River Island, focuses on the more commercial side of a collection rather than the creative and avant garde.

DD: What makes you stand out from the rest and shout?
Beatrice Newman: I guess what distinguishes me from others is that I am different and unique. Because I strive for excellence and perfection in everything I do, moreover I am an African with a culture that's loud and proud and in many respects rich and unique in the depths of its expression. I love to challenge fashion such that I become the moving target. In view of my determination and confidence I consider challenges as the means to bring the creative best out of me.

DD: If you could sell your designs to anybody, who would it be and why?
Beatrice Newman: If I could sell my designs to anybody it would be to the Noisettes lead singer Shingai Shaniwa, because they are loud, fresh, fierce, full of life and they are a representation of new generational style and direction. What's more I am very intrigued by the natural look of Shingai Shaniwa which is very inspiring.

Rachael Barrett - Royal College of Art:

DD: What do you think is the biggest problem that faces fashion graduates?
Rachel Barrett: Art school will teach you what you need to know to design and make, but getting the knowledge of how to promote and sell the work could mean doing another entire degree.

DD: What makes you stand out from the rest and shout?
Rachael Barrett: My new love of bizarre materials that I suspect will inspire the next few collections.

DD: If you could sell your designs to anybody, who would it be and why?
Rachael Barrett: Liberty Ross because she's been my favourite model since I started buying Vogue a decade ago, but I'd probably give her them for free...

Silent We Shout at Shop 14, Old Truman Brewery, 91 Brick Lane, London will be open from the 11th till 13th of September.
More Fashion