Morris Nomads

Ahead of his Fashion East debut, preview an exclusive film of Liam Hodges's SS14 collection

Liam Hodges creates a film exclusive to Dazed Digital exhibiting his Morris Nomads collection ahead of his presentation for LC:M Fashion East.

"I was interested in the way Morris dancers make their rag jackets, the face paint and the accessorising with bells," says Liam Hodges. The Medieval folk dance served as one half of the inspiration for Hodges' presentation today for Fashion East. The other half? Pub lad culture. "It really wasn't that much of a jump. When you go to these events there is dancing, plays and ale. Everyone descends on a town and there is an aspect of 'pub crawl' to the whole weekend as it is, from the Morris men as well as the local lads. I see it all as a little bit ritualistic."

Some people spend more on trainers than they ever would on a suit. I am not suggesting we burn Savile Row. I just think we can experiment with creating new ideas of luxury.

To translate these ideas into an exclusive film for Dazed, Hodges enlisted the help of four friends to demonstrate his vision. "For me the film was about a group of mates hanging out, just that attitude when it's only blokes there. Some people dismiss it as immature and stupid, but for me there's something a bit primal and fun that comes from it." The overlying sports commentary, meant to hint at the idea of being in a pub, gives this lo-fi hangout a plebeian edge. Hodges borrowed four friends: Tommy, Rob, Baxter and Jon, all of which he's "worked and lived with at some point." Styled by Dazed contributor Harry Lambert and filmed by Liam himself, the collection takes centre stage in a rooftop gathering. "As my friends, we often talk about ideas, for both my work and theirs. It's a good, supportive group. As men they are inspiring and each represent different aspects of the Liam Hodges brand. As models, they'll do almost anything for beer."

Growing up in Kent, Liam Hodges debuted his first collection as an undergrad. His departure from any catwalk standard matches his austere opinions about men's fashion. "I think as a generation, we are living in a time in which having one good suit that you wear for all best occasions is changing," explains Hodges. "Some people spend more on trainers than they ever would on a suit. I am not suggesting we burn Savile Row. I still aspire to have a tailor-made suit (I'd go to Mark Powell, though). I just think we can experiment with creating new ideas of luxury; it's a bit like a liberation for the way men dress. We have space to express ourselves with new gestures and shapes."

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