Miharayasuhiro x Browns

Japanese artistry rocked the British fashion boutique last night

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While all the shops along South Molton Lane prepared for Fashion's Night Out, the Japanese designer and Browns gave a head start with the launch of Miharayasuhiro's pop-up space in the men's boutique last night. Since showing at Paris Fashion Week, the eight-year-old label has become known as a bearer of inspiring Japanese culture and designs that transcend any national clichés.

For this season, I wanted to make a hybrid of the American military camouflage with Japanese Kabuki patterns and fabrics by finding a chemistry between them. We also used kimono silk and a needlepoint technique that's around 1,600 years old

For A/W12, this not only came in the form of a revived needlecraft technique from 1,600 years ago, but also the samurai guitarist‚ Miyavi, who provided the live soundtrack to his catwalk show and last night's party. "I love Mihara's designs because he's crazy! He describes himself as a conservative but he's not one at all. He's a great creator who makes something distinct from other designers. We share similar feelings, attitude and motivations", the Japanese musician says. For the next three months, Browns will house the A/W12 collection within a charming set created by Yasuhiro using abstracted photographs of his old shoe factory (an homage paid to his beginnings as a footwear designer) for wallpaper and antique chairs.

Dazed Digital: For the past six seasons, Browns has been your exclusive UK stockist but what sparked this project?
Mihara Yasuhiro:
When the big earthquake of 2011 happened in Japan, I was in London. Simon [Burstein, Browns CEO] is a good friend of mine and he told me he'd do anything to support me. He came to my show in Paris, and really liked the collection and the way Miyavi's performance tied in with it, so he invited us to do this.

DD: The main motifs for A/W 12 were the camouflage, cloud and cherry blossom. Tell us a bit about the iconography used, what motivated this and the textile you developed?
Mihara Yasuhiro: Being born and raised in Japan, we are very influenced by Western culture. Pure Japanese materials are not familiar to us anymore, so through blending in Western motifs I am able to express myself. For this season, I wanted to make a hybrid of the American military camouflage with Japanese Kabuki patterns and fabrics by finding a chemistry between them. We also used kimono silk and a needlepoint technique that's around 1,600 years old.

DD: What attracts you to Miyaki's music?
Mihara Yasuhiro: Apart from his technique, I love the emotions in his music. I make fashion but it's a long design process and the catwalk show lasts only about 10 minutes. I need it to show emotions and feelings and Miyaki played an important role in helping me do that. He's just trying to rock his own world and I love that.

DD: Finally, does British design ever influence your work at all?
Mihara Yasuhiro: Yes of course! Judy Blame is a big inspiration.

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