Let The Right One In

Watch Let The Right One In exclusively on Dazed Digital

Image
Stark, dark and stunningly original, Let The Right One In is vampire tale about a pre-adolescent, suburban bloodsucker you can actually believe in. Centring upon the burgeoning relationship between a bullied 12-year-old boy called Oskar and his new neighbour, the creepy, nightstalking Eli (played with incredible intensity by the young actress Lina Leandersson), the film is a strangely twisted ode to the trials of youth, and it has the feel of the ultimate childhood revenge fantasy. Stylistically, this film is almost beyond compare, there is no director in modern cinema that achieves quite the same cold, clinical and haunting feel as Tomas Alfredson does in this thriller, which is in part due to the icy cold, snowy landscape that acts as the frame in which his horrific tragedy unfolds. Scenes of Eli's desperate father blood-letting unsuspecting victims to keep his daughter alive are shot through with such pathological disregard for any emotion that they are at times difficult to watch. And that's really the crux of this film, the overarching sense of reality it achieves – despite being concerned with one of the oldest folklore archetypes known to humanity, when you leave the cinema you almost believe that all of this could actually be happening every other night in the suburbs of Sweden. Of course, Eli's insatiable thirst for blood eventually leads to her discovery and her blossoming friendship with the lonely tortured Oskar is threatened. But we don't want to give too much away here, so suffice to say that if you see one film this month, this cutting-edge Swedish horror should be it... it's perhaps the most important step forward in the genre since The Exorcist. Prepare yourself for a tale of existential angst, blood-letting, murder, childhood, love and friendship that is beyond parallel. Here, Dazed Digital gives you an exclusive preview of the film everyone is talking about...

You need to have the Macromedia Flash plugin installed to be able to play this video.

More Arts+Culture