The most prominent spots at Frieze New York

Ten of the best from this week's hottest contemporary art destination

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Yet another week, yet another wave of artwork. Frieze New York rolled on into its third year with a good dose of historical shows but the satellite NADA and Outsider Art Fair also gave it a run for its money, as well as some stand out gallery shows. These were the highlights of the fairground that were unfair, no fair, so fair and generally fairy.

JOSE LUIS VARGAS

San Juan gallery Roberto Paradise's stand at NADA was as exceptional as ever - this time with an even larger salon hang of the paintings of Jose Luis Vargas. The Puerto-Rico based artist's reworked street paintings with their speech bubbles, collage and overpainted elements were the highlight of the week.

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GREENGRASSI AT FRIEZE NEW YORK

This British gallery devoted their entire booth to Japanese surrealist psychedelic painters of the 1970s, largely by lesser-known names, and the results proved that art fairs do not have to be a space for mere product. No big surprise this space won the fair's stand prize.

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PIERRE HUYGHE

At the back of The Artist Institute's stand was a white room with one small photograph by Huyghe. It depicted a body in a desert preserved by the copper mine in the distance. It was so haunting and weird (and also not for sale) that the rest of the fair kind of faded in comparison

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SARA CWYNAR

The NYC-based Canadian photographic artist's work is getting weirder, more fragmented and saturated with digital rainbows. Showin at Toronto's Cooper Cole gallery, Cwynar proved she's a great artist worth keeping a serious eye on.

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KATHERINE BERNHARDT

Bernhardt was one of the boldest, brightest and funniest artists in the fairs (showing at CANADA at Frieze and Loyal at NADA). She depicted repeated images of cigarettes and toilet paper rolls on big fat canvases. Hot like neon orange.

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THE BOX AT FRIEZE NEW YORK

LA's Box continued its exceptional programming of forgotten west coast artists from the 60s- including the paintings of Stanley Fisher and multimedia collage works by Boris Lurie. Mara McCarthy is a curator who always gets it right.

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THE OUTSIDER ART FAIR

Sam Doyle at Just Folk and Dr Lakra at Baumman + Muksia were just a few of the incredible highlights in this fair in the old Dia building in Chelsea. It was a straightforward fair (read: a bit old fashioned) but with work this weird and refreshing from Japan to Germany, what else do you want?

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MATTHEW BRANNON

Brannon's graphic paintings, here of book covers and spines, continue to be intelligent, beautifully crafted, and tap in to a moment of fading intellectualism. New York and maybe the world doesnt make them like this anymore.

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GUDMUNDUR THORODDSEN

Asya Gesiberg devoted their entire Nada booth to this icelandic collage and ceramic artist. Lot of the work played around with the imagery of basketball - notably fitting as the fair took place in a basketball stadium. The ceramic trophys in particular were playful winners.

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MARK LECKEY AND KRISTEN BRATSCH AT GAVIN BROWN ENERPRICE

There were so many good shows on during Frieze (Mark Flood at Zach Feuer, Keith Haring at Gladstone Gallery, Sterling Ruby's monter show at Hauser and Wirth) but Gavin Brown had two shows on that were impeccable each in their own way. Leckey's 3D printer recreated his ongoing Dumb Things project while Bratsch exhibited new large marble paper works. If you were lucky someone would entice you upstairs to paint a black circle for Jonathan Horowitz project for $20.

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