Solar flares in Iceland

Tom Sewell captures the surreal beauty of Iceland's geological secrets for super/collider

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Tom Sewell

Every eleven years, the sun reaches a peak in its activity cycle, sending vast flares and plumes of material outwards into space. A few days later, these particles reach the earth’s magnetic fields, drawing down towards the poles to create the Auroras. Last month, with the sun at its maximum, we went in search of the northern lights and other natural wonders of Iceland. From silent, now-muddied glaciers to bubbling geothermal vents, the landscape is alive with scientific, geological and natural features. With us was über-talented artist and art director Tom Sewell, who captured this series of images and interventions. “There’s something in the rocks,” muses Tom. “The rainbows in the waterfalls... the steam from the water... a still lake full of ice – the landscape is in charge. Like all the best places, you don't matter.”

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Tom Sewell

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