Corridor8

The Manchester-based quarterly offers a platform for the best contemporary visual art and new writing in the North of England

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What is it about having art and poetry in newsprint, bound together in glossy white paper and held together with nothing more than a plastic band, I ask you? Since such a thing, going by the name of Corridor8, landed on our desks at Dazed last month we’ve been left feeling a bit weird: a journal just shouldn’t be able to make us feel this good.

Paul Rooney is a great artist and an extremely eloquent writer. His article on Liverpool is not only an incisive insight into one of Britain’s most complex and distinctive cities, but a timely consideration of art’s role in regeneration and marketing

First launched in 2009 as a collaboration between editor Roger McKinley, publisher Michael Butterworth and design collective, Dust, the idea was to provide a platform for the best contemporary visual art and new writing in the North of England. Now as it revs up for the third part of its third instalment, it’s safe to say that Corridor8 is doing a mighty fine job of doing just that. We speak to the journal’s current editor Bryony Bond.

Dazed Digital: You must have people fighting over themselves to be involved with this project. How do you decide on content for the journal?
Bryony Bond: We often take a long view, and work through a particular idea over a year, so we often have writers and artists in mind to feature from the outset. For example, this year we’ve gone quarterly and each of the four parts deals with a particular facet of the arts ecology, interviewing key individuals from educational organisations to commercial galleries. The four parts will come together at the end of the year to produce a snapshot of one year’s activity across the North.

DD: What was the idea behind issue 3.3?
Bryony Bond: As the third of 2012’s four part edition we’ve continued some threads that run throughout the year, with a backbone of interviews on a component part of the arts ecology, a portrait of a particular city, a new literary work and an insert. For 3.3 the journal has something of an educational and Liverpudlian focus. We interview key individuals in education, from the independent to the university departments, Paul Rooney writes about what it means to be an artist in Liverpool and Jenny Diski, in an article that brings both elements together, remembers taking pupils from the Free School she ran in London on an exchange to Liverpool in the 1970s.

DD: Who should we be looking out for in the new issue?
Bryony Bond:
Paul Rooney is a great artist and an extremely eloquent writer. His article on Liverpool is not only an incisive insight into one of Britain’s most complex and distinctive cities, but a timely consideration of art’s role in regeneration and marketing. Mexico, a collective based in Leeds are profiled by the educator, writer and contributor of our insert, Derek Horton.

Formed by graduates from all three of Leeds’ rival art courses, Mexico advocates a spirit of collaboration, experimentation and ambition that promises good things. Eoin Shea has made an illustration for the start of each Corridor8 #3 and is also in our guest insert by online magazine Soanyway. Shea’s illustrations have captured the flavour of each part and are strangely timeless – we like how you don’t know if they were made yesterday or 30 years ago.

DD: Where can I get hold of a copy?
Bryony Bond: We’re distributed by Central Books, so if your local gallery or bookshop doesn’t stock us – ask them to! Tate Modern, the ICA, Walter Koenig Books and Camden Arts Centre in London stock us, and many galleries nationally and internationally, but you can also subscribe online at www.corridor8.co.uk/subscribe

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