Luke Caulfield's Second Hand

The British artist's Lazarides Rathbone expo mixes Berini sculptures and neon light works

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Rathbone Street Gallery's 'Second Hand' expo is the latest offering from time travelling whizz of anachronism, Luke Caulfield. Bringing together Berini sculptures and neon light works, his multimedia pieces aim to recreate the emotional essence of past events; the truth that history books fail to convey in all their factual limitation. We caught up with the artist ahead of the show’s opening tonight at the Lazarides gallery...

The structures of the work are logical, taking something from history and trying to replay it. My structures in some way concern themselves with duplication, such as the choice to use the clone tool on Photoshop during the initial stages of image building

Dazed Digital: What draws you to painting over other methods?
Luke Caulfield: Well, I'm open to any medium and do use sculpture and photography but it is true that painting has been most common in my work. As a medium of documentation it is flawed and vulnerable, this allows for "cracks" or "slippage" which keep the work alive. By painting I hope to blur the line between art history and the now.

DD: How do audiences react to the nostalgic elements of your work?
Luke Caulfield: I don't often know how people really react to my work, maybe it's best not to! I have made friends with nostalgia as a human way of relating to the past. I don´t like to condemn it but if something is nostalgic without any critical distance, then I would personally find it less interesting.

DD: Is the work about fantasy or reality?
Luke Caulfield: Big question. The structures of the work are logical, taking something from history and trying to replay it. My structures in some way concern themselves with duplication, such as the choice to use the clone tool on Photoshop during the initial stages of image building. But within these structures unforeseen elements creep in. I wouldn't want to say what is fantasy and what is reality but whatever the reality of the perception of time is, that is what I am interested in.

DD: What, besides other art, influences your work?
Luke Caulfield: Well, I used to answer this question by mentioning people like Samuel Beckett, Henri Bergson, David Lynch and Bertolt Brecht, but these days I am not conscious of what influences me, although I am sure the daily tsunami of electronic information available must be an influence.

Second Hand will run until the 16th August at the Lazarides Rathbone Gallery

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